Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: Significant drop in download speed

  1. #21
    Rob,
    Thanks for your comment.

    As stated in other posts unfortunately BT Wholesale is all most of us have at the moment. Whilst I fully appreciate all the efforts being made to find a meaningful solution to our local broadband issues we currently don't have a timeline or certainty yet regarding achieving these alternatives. Unfortunately you often have to work with what you have, hence my earlier post regarding the possibility of a more collective approach to BT as an interim step using the White Box data? Yesterday afternoon BT Retail actually called me in way of a follow up to ensure the problem was fixed and gave me a direct number to call if the problem returned. Thats a first from them.

    Paul W
    Last edited by Paul W; 28-03-2012 at 02:45 PM. Reason: clarity

  2. #22

    Back to speed

    I too am back to 6+ after nagging BT for some time.

    One agent 'made' me reset the router although I protested vehemently. Story too long for here. As a result it knocked all the wireless connected machines in the house off line. it was a bit of a pain to get them back.

    Douglas

  3. #23
    Hi Doug,
    Is it a pretty stable 6+, and so without any obvious contention problem? If so then this is a good result for Speldhurst and shows what is achievable for those who are more distant from the Exchange. If you originally had a contention problem then it would indicate that BT have moved you to an uncontended DSLAM card at the exchange. The signs are that BT has been having new equipment racks installed at the Exchange and so am hoping this indicates more DSLAM cards and a reduction in contention issues (for the time being) - but just guessing.

    Lawrence

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by dlh1 View Post
    I too am back to 6+ after nagging BT for some time.

    One agent 'made' me reset the router although I protested vehemently. Story too long for here. As a result it knocked all the wireless connected machines in the house off line. it was a bit of a pain to get them back.

    Douglas
    Hi Douglas,

    Don't feel too bad. I got so fed up with them asking me to reset things to "defaults" that I bought another router, to THEIR specs, which I plug in just before calling them. My router is Enterprise grade stuff costing a LOT (700 new), yet it isn't "supported", so I bought a SpeedTouch 6xx for 20 off eBay.

    This is the kind of thing that "commodity" large ISPs do to make the numbers work. A community Fibre ISP wouldn't be like this - we'd all be local, and helping each other. Ah well ... hopefully more announcements soon.

    --RobL.
    --
    IM me to chat

  5. #25

    Download Speed

    Lawrence,

    Yes it does seem stable at 6.5.

    RobL,
    Forgive me if I sound sceptical. 'I am not a 'techie' and therefore could be talking nonsense. Community fibre, if I understand it correctly, sounds expensive. I need to say that I don't need or want megaspeeds. I would be very happy just to keep what I now have.

    IIRC the original questionnaire didn't have the 'pay nothing more but expect what we were promised option' and so views such as mine were not easily expressed.

    Even if some ISP came along and offered me, say, 20Mbps guaranteed, I wouldn't be prepared to pay any extra for it. Having spoken to a number of neighbours I know that their attitude is very similar.

    Douglas
    Last edited by dlh1; 31-03-2012 at 08:15 AM.

  6. #26

    Smile It's all about choice, and what it means to you - not Mbps

    Quote Originally Posted by dlh1 View Post
    Lawrence,

    Yes it does seem stable at 6.5.

    RobL,
    Forgive me if I sound sceptical. 'I am not a 'techie' and therefore could be talking nonsense. Community fibre, if I understand it correctly, sounds expensive. I need to say that I don't need or want megaspeeds. I would be very happy just to keep what I now have.

    IIRC the original questionnaire didn't have the 'pay nothing more but expect what we were promised option' and so views such as mine were not easily expressed.

    Even if some ISP came along and offered me, say, 20Mbps guaranteed, I wouldn't be prepared to pay any extra for it. Having spoken to a number of neighbours I know that their attitude is very similar.

    Douglas
    Douglas - not a problem. If you are happy with what you have (I don't know what that is) then great. In 2-3 years however, digital cameras will routinely be producing images between 5 and 15 Mbyte, which, with what you have (I do know with certainty what the maximum upload speed is if you are connected to a BT telephone switch in the parish, with a "normal" ADSL connection) will take a minimum of 1.5 minutes to send via Email. You will also be unable to use HD video conferencing, which has long been supported by Skype and others. HD web cams are becoming the standard already.

    Now, I don't know how much this means to you, but more and more applications are arriving (www.youview.com, anything with "Cloud" in it) which are relying on high bandwidth and more balanced upload vs download speeds. An iPhone can now backup to the Cloud - if it's a 16GB iPhone, with 10GB of data to backup, this will take more than 50 hours - ridiculous.

    Your current service will fall further and further behind the rest of the country, with fewer and fewer options to use the new stuff. Already BBC's iPlayer compensates for your broadband speed by downgrading image quality without telling you, so that you can watch it without pausing/buffering. Like analogue TV signals, eventually, they may turn this feature off preferring the mainstream high definition service. Just an example.

    What we did learn from the survey, was that there are also many people in the community (including many of my neighbours) who are hungry for speeds comparable to those in Rusthall and Tunbridge Wells, and are willing to pay a *small* amount extra to get them, today. That's what "community fibre" is, with the difference being instead of a small amount extra to get 20-40Mbps, you get 1000 Mbps with a help desk and service run by the community, for the community. As for "ISP promises", wouldn't it be nice to have responses directly from a local community broadband service with local interests primary to their existence, rather than a national service that really doesn't treat you as anything other than "just another subscriber"? The national players' primary interest is their share holders.

    I'm not trying to convince you one way or the other. We are planning to build a "road show" which demonstrates the difference "community fibre" can make in non-technology terms with a synchronous service at "silly" speeds. It has been proven to increase house values, and bring business into rural areas that wouldn't otherwise have considered the move. I know the current service cuts down on my travel already, albeit clunky and unreliable due to the speeds available.

    This is built upon a non-profit company model, using local skills and resources, with a price tag of 30/month inc. VAT.

    All I'm asking is that you take a look at it when we start driving it around and showing it off. It doesn't need everyone to take up the service to make a very positive difference to life in the parish!

    Thanks,
    --RobL.
    --
    IM me to chat

  7. #27

    Community Fibre

    Quote Originally Posted by RobL View Post
    Douglas - not a problem. If you are happy with what you have (I don't know what that is) then great. In 2-3 years however, digital cameras will routinely be producing images between 5 and 15 Mbyte, which, with what you have (I do know with certainty what the maximum upload speed is if you are connected to a BT telephone switch in the parish, with a "normal" ADSL connection) will take a minimum of 1.5 minutes to send via Email. You will also be unable to use HD video conferencing, which has long been supported by Skype and others. HD web cams are becoming the standard already.

    Now, I don't know how much this means to you, but more and more applications are arriving (www.youview.com, anything with "Cloud" in it) which are relying on high bandwidth and more balanced upload vs download speeds. An iPhone can now backup to the Cloud - if it's a 16GB iPhone, with 10GB of data to backup, this will take more than 50 hours - ridiculous.

    Your current service will fall further and further behind the rest of the country, with fewer and fewer options to use the new stuff. Already BBC's iPlayer compensates for your broadband speed by downgrading image quality without telling you, so that you can watch it without pausing/buffering. Like analogue TV signals, eventually, they may turn this feature off preferring the mainstream high definition service. Just an example.

    What we did learn from the survey, was that there are also many people in the community (including many of my neighbours) who are hungry for speeds comparable to those in Rusthall and Tunbridge Wells, and are willing to pay a *small* amount extra to get them, today. That's what "community fibre" is, with the difference being instead of a small amount extra to get 20-40Mbps, you get 1000 Mbps with a help desk and service run by the community, for the community. As for "ISP promises", wouldn't it be nice to have responses directly from a local community broadband service with local interests primary to their existence, rather than a national service that really doesn't treat you as anything other than "just another subscriber"? The national players' primary interest is their share holders.

    I'm not trying to convince you one way or the other. We are planning to build a "road show" which demonstrates the difference "community fibre" can make in non-technology terms with a synchronous service at "silly" speeds. It has been proven to increase house values, and bring business into rural areas that wouldn't otherwise have considered the move. I know the current service cuts down on my travel already, albeit clunky and unreliable due to the speeds available.

    This is built upon a non-profit company model, using local skills and resources, with a price tag of 30/month inc. VAT.

    All I'm asking is that you take a look at it when we start driving it around and showing it off. It doesn't need everyone to take up the service to make a very positive difference to life in the parish!

    Thanks,
    --RobL.
    Hi Rob,

    I appreciate that different people have different needs. However just to answer a few of your points. My current speed is 6.5Mbps.

    1. My digital camera already produces files of 37Mb and I regularly email versions of them. I wouldn't dream of emailing a full size file and all image editing programmes (every camera comes with one) have a 'save to web option' that allows a significant file size reduction.
    2. I have no need for video conferencing but do use Skype. I'm happy with current quality. I don't need or want to see the other end in HD. There are a couple of my contacts where the quality is very poor - but the problem lies with the phone system in their country - not at my end.
    3. There's no way that I would trust any of my back ups to the net. I want it under my control.
    4. I don't watch much TV and have never used iplayer or similar.


    I will, however, keep an open mind and be interested in developments. I just thought it important that you heard an alternative point of view because, as I said before, I believe that the original questionnaire was designed in a way that made it difficult to express the above opinion.

    RGDS
    Douglas

  8. #28
    Thanks Douglas - always good to have a balance.

    As this area of the forum represents individuals leading with the Whitebox initiative, there are a great many folks out there who aren't happy with current broadband service, who responded to the survey - over 600. I'm trying to represent some of their input, until they sign up and get involved here in the forum of course! I myself, would bite someone's arm off to get access to 1Gbps synchronous, and pay a premium for it - but I'm likely to be the LAST to benefit from the B4RS service due to my realtively urban location in the centre of Langton Green. I get 7.2 Mbps down and 700Kbps upstream, sometimes, unreliably, but that's far too slow for my applications.

    The questionnaire was designed by committee, given the community input of "we're not happy", and I guess a "no response" to specific questions (e.g. Q14) would have said "I'm happy as I am today". Yes it could have been better.

    NGA (Next Generation Access) isn't for everyone. NGA is our government's definition, not ours!

    --RobL.
    PS: I've attached v1.2 of the survey for reference to refresh people's memories. It was such a long time ago we ran the survey.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    --
    IM me to chat

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •